Myth of phaethon

Myths Phaethon and the Sun Chariot According to the ancient myths, the Sun was put in a chariot and everyday God Helios would drive the chariot all along the sky. That is how the Sun would rise and set. Phaethon was the son the god Helios who secretely took the chariot one day to drive it.

Myth of phaethon

The god reluctantly conceded to the boy's wishes and handed him the reigns. But his inexperience proved fatal, for Phaethon quickly lost control of the immortal steeds and the sun-chariot veered out of control setting the earth ablaze.

The plains of Africa were scorched to desert and men charred black. Zeus, appalled by the destruction, smote the boy with a thunderbolt, hurling his flaming body into the waters of the River Eridanos. Phaethon's sisters, the Heliadesgathered on the banks and in their mourning were transformed into amber-teared poplar trees.

After his death Phaethon was placed amongst the stars as the constellation Auriga "the Charioteer"or else transformed into the god of the star which the Greeks named Phaethon --the planet Jupiter or Saturn.

Myth of phaethon

The genealogy of Phaethon, however, is not the same in all writers, for some call him a son of Clymenus, the son of Helios, by Merope Hygin.

He received the significant name Phaethon from his father, and was afterwards also presumptuos and ambitious enough to request his father one Myth of phaethon to allow him to drive the Myth of phaethon of the sun across the heavens.

Helios was induced by the entreaties of his son and of Clymene to yield, but the youth being too weak to cheek the horses, came down with his chariot, and so near to the earth, that he almost set it on fire.

Zeus, therefore, killed him with a flash of lightning, so that he fell down into the river Eridanus or the Po. His sisters, who had yoked the horses to the chariot, were metamorphosed into poplars, and their tears into amber.

Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology. His sisters formed the titular chorus. Euripides' version of the Phaethon story diverged in certain respects from the earlier play by Aeschylus.

Later accounts of the story--e. Many poets have told this. Rieu Greek epic C3rd B.

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They reached the outfall of that deep lake where Phaethon, struck in the breast and half-consumed by a blazing thunderbolt, fell into the water from the chariot of Helios the Sun.

His wounded body smoulders to this day and sends up clouds of steam. Even the light-winged birds that try to fly across the water fail to reach the other side and with a helpless flutter plunge into the heat.

All around, the Daughters of the Sun Heliadesencased in tall poplars, utter their sad and unavailing plaint. Shining drops of amber fall from their eyes onto the sands and are dried by the sun.

But when the wailing wind stirs the dark waters of the lake to rise above the beach, all the tersr that have collected there are swept by the overflow into the river.

At night they had to listen to the loud lament of the shrill-voiced Daughters of Helios Heliadeswhose tears were borne along on the stream like drops of oil [i. Oldfather Greek historian C1st B.

Consequently Zeus, being indignant because of what had happened, smote Phaethon with a thunderbolt and brought back the sun to its accustomed course. And Phaethon fell to the earth at the mouths of the river which is now known as the Pados Pobut in ancient times was called the Eridanos, and his sisters [the Heliades] vied with each other in bewailing his death and by reason of their exceeding grief underwent a metamorphosis of their nature, becoming poplar trees.

Jones Greek travelogue C2nd A. Way Greek epic C4th A. These, for undying honour to his son, the god [Helios] made amber, precious in men's eyes.

Earth verily seemed ablaze, and black smoke hovered on the air. Fairbanks Greek rhetorician C3rd A. The story is that they are shed for Phaethon; for in his passion for driving this son of Helios the Sun ventured to mount his father's chariot, but because he did not keep a firm rein he came to grief and fell into the Eridanos--wise men interpret the story as indicating a superabundance of the fiery element in nature, but for poets and painters it is simply a chariot and horses--and at his fall the heavens are confounded.

Nyx Night is driving Hemera Day from the noonday sky, and the sun's orb as it plunges toward the earth draws in its train the Astera Stars.

The Horai Seasons or Hours abandon their posts at the gates and flee toward the gloom that rises to meet them, while the horses have thrown off their yoke and rush madly on. Despairing, Ge Gaea, the Earth raises her hands in supplication, as the furious fire draws near her.

Now the youth is thrown from the chariot and is falling headlong--for his hair is on fire and his breast smouldering with the heat; his fall will end in the river Eridanos and will furnish this stream with a mythical tale.

For swans scattered about, breathing sweet notes, will hymn the youth; and flocks of swans rising aloft will sing the story to [the rivers] Kaystros Cayster and Istros Ister ; nor will any place fail to hear the strange story.

And they will have Zephyros the West Windnimble god of wayside shrines, to accompany their song, for it is said that Zephyros has made a compact with the swans to join them in the music of the dirge.Discover the myth of Phaethon and the Sun Chariot Looking for his father According to the Greek Mythology, Phaethon, whose name means "shining", was the son of the Sun-God Helios and a mortal woman, Clymene.

Phaethon, a young man, travels to the Palace of the Sun to meet Apollo and find out if the sun god is in fact his father. Apollo says he is. To prove it, he will give Phaethon anything he wants, swearing by the River Styx that he will grant Phaethon his wildest dream.

The boy's dream is to ride. Discover the myth of Phaethon and the Sun Chariot Looking for his father.

FAMILY OF PHAETHON

According to the Greek Mythology, Phaethon, whose name means "shining", was the son of the Sun-God Helios and a mortal woman, Clymene. Phaethon, a young man, travels to the Palace of the Sun to meet Apollo and find out if the sun god is in fact his father. Apollo says he is. To prove it, he will give Phaethon anything he wants, swearing by the River Styx that he will grant Phaethon his wildest dream.

The boy's dream is to ride Apollo's chariot. Phaethon and the Sun God Helios The mythical story of Phaethon by Emma M. Firth. The Myth of Phaethon Phaethion was a tall, handsome youth, with flashing eyes and a dauntless spirit.

wings, or the myth about Phaethon, the son of Helios, who failed to perform a task too great for him (controlling the horses of the chariot of the Sun)..

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